The Hit Row Z Premier League Survival Guide

If offered at the beginning of most seasons, the majority of fans from the three newly promoted clubs competing in the Barclays’ Premier League would accept a guaranteed 17th placed finish.

This season it is Leicester City, Burnley and Queen’s Park Rangers, who were each basking in triumph and glory during 2014, and are now focussed solely on survival. But what is the best way of ensuring your club avoids relegation first time around?

Recent seasons have seen a number of promoted clubs take different approaches to maintaining their stay in the top flight beyond one season. But there are no easy answers here. For every example that suggests a particular approach is the right one, another indicates it could be a disastrous option.

This in itself highlights just how fine the margins involved in running a football club at the top level really are, and how easy it is for a club to imperceptibly slide from pursuing a responsible strategy of investment or consolidation, to having to bet the house on survival.

Featured below is the Hit Row Z Premier League Survival Guide, which draws on lessons from previous years in the Premier League as to the kind of approaches that can guarantee a promoted club survival in the league.

6610920243_b59290bbf9_bPart 1: Splash the cash and make a great leap forward

Example to follow: Stoke City
One to avoid: QPR

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Norwich_City_ChampionsPart 2: Bank the cash and keep the faith

Example to follow: Norwich City
One to avoid: Reading

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SouthamptonStoke19May2013Part 3: Attack as the best form of defence

Example to follow: Southampton
One to avoid: Blackpool

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West_Ham_match_Boleyn_Ground_2006 (1)

Part 4: Build a fortress that rivals will fear

Example to follow: West Ham United
One to avoid: Burnley

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Selhurst_ParkPart 5: Conclusions

A look back at the lessons from previous parts, and some key messages for promoted clubs looking to survive in the Premier League

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